learningtobealiveagain

theicelandicmountaindaisy:

One of my favourite things about Harry Potter is that Harry is such an unreliable narrator, not because he’s lying, but because he was so oblivious, just about anything could be going on under his nose and he wouldn’t even notice. It’s great because it supports basically every headcanon. Like, no, Harry would not have noticed if Sirius and Remus were dating, I know he’s The Chosen One but he’s about as perspective as a pile of bricks.

crazykattlady

sssibilance:

yourpersonalcheerleader:

linrenzo:

videohall:

Baby laughing while getting shots

> Rock star doctor.

I don’t care how old he will be I’m taking my future children to him

My heart!

That person is in the right field!  So many pediatricians are terrible with children; you can tell this person LOVES children and taking care of them.

friendlyfangirl88
tinuelena:

twinkbuscemi:

happystabby:

niallercakez:

This pisses me off because it’s bloody true

Okay but the fact of life is that you need these skills to be an adult and have a job (it literally doesn’t matter what kind of job) and anxiety is a thing that can be improved. Not cured, but improved. I would be so much worse if school didn’t make me do these things.

yea ok but no, teachers aren’t trained in exposure therapy and therefore do not have the skills to make forcing a kid to trigger their anxiety in a safe environment so like, great if that helped you, but for the most part that’s bullshit

It’s a tricky deal. I’ve been on both ends of it. As a Language Arts teacher in the US, I have to be mindful of:
Common Core state standards. If you look at the strands, you’ll notice that there are requirements for writing, reading, and communication, which includes speech and oral presentations. The high school that I work at requires students to pass all of these standards before issuing a diploma.
IEP (Individual Education Plan)/504 plans/LRE (Least Restrictive Environment)/etc. A student must be diagnosed with a disability, then assigned a case manager from the special education (for IEP) or guidance (for 504) department. That case manager will then write an education plan for the student. On the IEP, accommodations and modifications will be listed. For example, a student with a reading disability will have accommodations like audiobooks and modifications like extended time on assignments. If the student is diagnosed with anxiety, the case manager might note on the IEP that oral presentations are to be excused. The tricky thing is, I cannot excuse an assignment which fulfills a graduation standard if it is not expressly stated on the IEP. So if a student has anxiety and his/her case manager has not listed that they are not to do oral presentations, they literally have to do a speech in order to pass my class. Some students would likely function better in smaller or more specialized classes; however, due to LRE laws, they are placed in my classroom and, as a result, experience high levels of anxiety as they constantly compare themselves to their peers.
Being fair. During my first year of teaching, in an attempt to be sensitive to the needs of my students with anxiety, I offered to allow students to give speeches outside of class if they felt they were too anxious to do so in class. I had one class of tenth-graders; nearly half of them elected to do their speech out of class. Of those, only three had an anxiety disorder. Two months later, with my three classes of freshmen, I knew I couldn’t do that. I visited privately with the students whose IEPs and 504s listed an anxiety disorder, and offered to let them do it outside of class. Most of them gratefully accepted that offer. But in class, it was a constant “Why doesn’t so-and-so have to do hers in class?” Of course, I couldn’t reveal a medical condition to the students’ peers, and it puts a real damper on the classroom environment and the teacher/student trust I need to build.
Doing what’s best for my students. happystabby up there is absolutely right: “anxiety is a thing that can be improved. Not cured, but improved.” Let me tell you… I have anxiety. And being a teacher is one hell of a high-stress occupation. Students often don’t see what goes on behind the scenes: 150 essays to correct, lesson plans to make, units to design, meetings to attend, our own homework to do (we have plenty!), parents to deal with, a few students who want to make our jobs as hard as possible, extracurriculars to run… it’s rewarding, but it takes a toll on an introvert with an anxiety disorder. In order to have this job and succeed at it, I had to improve my anxiety. Is it cured? No. But I am far better at managing it than I used to be. When I was younger, my anxiety over speaking was so severe that I couldn’t even order for myself at a restaurant. My parents wouldn’t take me to a therapist— even when I asked. So who did I have to help me improve my anxiety? Teachers. No one tried to make me speak while crying like twinkbuscemi talked about in tags (what an asshole move for a teacher to make, btw), but they were no-nonsense about it: to succeed in life, you need to be able to talk to people, and in front of people. And it’s true… communication is important! Thanks to the teachers who knew what was best for me, I am a functioning adult with a good job. What would have happened if I didn’t learn to manage my anxiety? I hate to imagine. I wouldn’t have a job, that’s for sure. I care a great deal about my students, and I want to see them succeed. That’s why I hound them for their assignments, make sure they’re on top of their work, encourage them to keep learning, and push them beyond their comfort zone.  
So what’s the solution? I don’t know. Here are some things I’ve done after that Year 1 fiasco:
Speech anxiety workshops, where we talk about and practice strategies to ease the anxiety of speaking in front of people.
The “give it a shot” rule: You have to at least try. If you feel like you could have done better, if you start crying and need to sit down, if you blank, you can re-do it for a better grade… and you can re-do it with only me in the room.
Small groups. We do team debate in 10th, and there’s no way to go it alone. I put the kids who struggle with speech anxiety in groups with people they feel 100% comfortable with, and they come in to do theirs with only me in the room.
(Of course, these are all for kids whose IEPs/504 plans don’t have any accommodations/modifications regarding communication standards and oral presentations. Those plans are followed to a T.)
My job as a teacher is to prepare kids for life. I don’t want to traumatize them, I’m not out to embarrass them, and I don’t want to hurt them. I’m not a therapist, and I’m not trained in exposure therapy. I do my best; not all kids are privileged enough to have access to someone with knowledge and training like that. So if we teachers don’t push them, they won’t succeed in college, a career, or the community… and I want them to live good, successful, happy lives.

tinuelena:

twinkbuscemi:

happystabby:

niallercakez:

This pisses me off because it’s bloody true

Okay but the fact of life is that you need these skills to be an adult and have a job (it literally doesn’t matter what kind of job) and anxiety is a thing that can be improved. Not cured, but improved. I would be so much worse if school didn’t make me do these things.

yea ok but no, teachers aren’t trained in exposure therapy and therefore do not have the skills to make forcing a kid to trigger their anxiety in a safe environment so like, great if that helped you, but for the most part that’s bullshit

It’s a tricky deal. I’ve been on both ends of it. As a Language Arts teacher in the US, I have to be mindful of:

  • Common Core state standards. If you look at the strands, you’ll notice that there are requirements for writing, reading, and communication, which includes speech and oral presentations. The high school that I work at requires students to pass all of these standards before issuing a diploma.
  • IEP (Individual Education Plan)/504 plans/LRE (Least Restrictive Environment)/etc. A student must be diagnosed with a disability, then assigned a case manager from the special education (for IEP) or guidance (for 504) department. That case manager will then write an education plan for the student. On the IEP, accommodations and modifications will be listed. For example, a student with a reading disability will have accommodations like audiobooks and modifications like extended time on assignments. If the student is diagnosed with anxiety, the case manager might note on the IEP that oral presentations are to be excused. The tricky thing is, I cannot excuse an assignment which fulfills a graduation standard if it is not expressly stated on the IEP. So if a student has anxiety and his/her case manager has not listed that they are not to do oral presentations, they literally have to do a speech in order to pass my class. Some students would likely function better in smaller or more specialized classes; however, due to LRE laws, they are placed in my classroom and, as a result, experience high levels of anxiety as they constantly compare themselves to their peers.
  • Being fair. During my first year of teaching, in an attempt to be sensitive to the needs of my students with anxiety, I offered to allow students to give speeches outside of class if they felt they were too anxious to do so in class. I had one class of tenth-graders; nearly half of them elected to do their speech out of class. Of those, only three had an anxiety disorder. Two months later, with my three classes of freshmen, I knew I couldn’t do that. I visited privately with the students whose IEPs and 504s listed an anxiety disorder, and offered to let them do it outside of class. Most of them gratefully accepted that offer. But in class, it was a constant “Why doesn’t so-and-so have to do hers in class?” Of course, I couldn’t reveal a medical condition to the students’ peers, and it puts a real damper on the classroom environment and the teacher/student trust I need to build.
  • Doing what’s best for my students. happystabby up there is absolutely right: “anxiety is a thing that can be improved. Not cured, but improved.” Let me tell you… I have anxiety. And being a teacher is one hell of a high-stress occupation. Students often don’t see what goes on behind the scenes: 150 essays to correct, lesson plans to make, units to design, meetings to attend, our own homework to do (we have plenty!), parents to deal with, a few students who want to make our jobs as hard as possible, extracurriculars to run… it’s rewarding, but it takes a toll on an introvert with an anxiety disorder. In order to have this job and succeed at it, I had to improve my anxiety. Is it cured? No. But I am far better at managing it than I used to be. When I was younger, my anxiety over speaking was so severe that I couldn’t even order for myself at a restaurant. My parents wouldn’t take me to a therapist— even when I asked. So who did I have to help me improve my anxiety? Teachers. No one tried to make me speak while crying like twinkbuscemi talked about in tags (what an asshole move for a teacher to make, btw), but they were no-nonsense about it: to succeed in life, you need to be able to talk to people, and in front of people. And it’s true… communication is important! Thanks to the teachers who knew what was best for me, I am a functioning adult with a good job. What would have happened if I didn’t learn to manage my anxiety? I hate to imagine. I wouldn’t have a job, that’s for sure. I care a great deal about my students, and I want to see them succeed. That’s why I hound them for their assignments, make sure they’re on top of their work, encourage them to keep learning, and push them beyond their comfort zone.  image
  • So what’s the solution? I don’t know. Here are some things I’ve done after that Year 1 fiasco:
  • Speech anxiety workshops, where we talk about and practice strategies to ease the anxiety of speaking in front of people.
  • The “give it a shot” rule: You have to at least try. If you feel like you could have done better, if you start crying and need to sit down, if you blank, you can re-do it for a better grade… and you can re-do it with only me in the room.
  • Small groups. We do team debate in 10th, and there’s no way to go it alone. I put the kids who struggle with speech anxiety in groups with people they feel 100% comfortable with, and they come in to do theirs with only me in the room.
  • (Of course, these are all for kids whose IEPs/504 plans don’t have any accommodations/modifications regarding communication standards and oral presentations. Those plans are followed to a T.)

My job as a teacher is to prepare kids for life. I don’t want to traumatize them, I’m not out to embarrass them, and I don’t want to hurt them. I’m not a therapist, and I’m not trained in exposure therapy. I do my best; not all kids are privileged enough to have access to someone with knowledge and training like that. So if we teachers don’t push them, they won’t succeed in college, a career, or the community… and I want them to live good, successful, happy lives.